Cassiefairy – My Thrifty Life

Cassiefairy's thrifty lifestyle blog – Saving money every day with DIY crafts, sewing projets, low-cost recipes & shppping tips


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Pieday Friday – Bottomless Harvest Pie

After going foraging on a blackberry walk last weekend, today’s blog post is the result of that walk. I decided to combine the blackberries with apples (cooking apples are abundant in the garden at the moment) and make a bottomless pie. What does that mean? It means that I made a blind-baked pie base and it shrunk so much that I couldn’t use it! I therefore went for just a pie crust on top of the filling in a pie dish. Don’t worry, it tasted just as yummy and actually it’s a little bit of a healthier pudding, because there’s about half the amount of pastry!diy-recipe-baking-harvest-pie-cooking-apple-and-blackberry-pastry-dessert-pudding-7 diy-recipe-baking-harvest-pie-cooking-apple-and-blackberry-pastry-dessert-pudding-3Ingredients: 225g plain flour, 100g butter, 25g caster sugar, 2 tablespoons water, a pinch of salt, 100g sugar, a dash of amaretto, plus as many cooking apples as it takes to fill your pie dish and as many blackberries as you can gather!

The pastry: Combine the flour, sugar and salt in a bowl and rub in the butter using your fingertips. Add the cold water and stir with a knife until it comes together into a stuff dough. Roll out on a floured surface to the thickness of a pound coin. By the way, my pretty rolling pin is from The Caravan Trail if you’re interested. I like to use it for pastry as it’s ceramic so stays cool – very important in pastry-making!diy-recipe-baking-harvest-pie-cooking-apple-and-blackberry-pastry-dessert-pudding diy-recipe-baking-harvest-pie-cooking-apple-and-blackberry-pastry-dessert-pudding-2The filling: Peel, core and slice enough apples to fill your pie dish. Put the apples in a pan over a medium heat and add 100g sugar to sweeten the tangy taste of the cooking apples and a splash of water (or a dash of amaretto if you like the flavour). Allow to cook down (keeping some chunky bits) and allow the apples to become a little mushy. Taste the apples and add more sugar if needed. diy-recipe-baking-harvest-pie-cooking-apple-and-blackberry-pastry-dessert-pudding-4 diy-recipe-baking-harvest-pie-cooking-apple-and-blackberry-pastry-dessert-pudding-5

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Harvest decorations in my home

Over the weekend I went for a lovely chilly walk with my hubby and collected a few bits and pieces for my harvest display. I’d planned to decorate my home for autumn (as we discussed in this previous blog post) and I’d finally found the time to nip out to collect together nature’s freebies to add to my sideboard. unfortunately I don’t have a mantlepiece in my home, so I couldn’t arrange my decorations around a fireplace, but my retro teak sideboard was a good substitute and provided plenty of space for a big display.

my retro living room harvest floral arrangment table display 2013

I started with a few hydrangea heads from the bush in my garden and added some rosehip buds and thistles, which created the floral centrepiece. I then added a second vase of grasses and poppy seed-heads and a bowl full of apples and oranges. After adding a few candles here and there, I decided to scatter around some conkers and acorns, elderberries and some more rosehip branches. And what autumn display would be complete without a big orange pumpkin?

harvest floral arrangment table display orange pumpkin retro living room

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My Favourite Photos – Harvest in Suffolk

It’s that lovely time of year again when crops are harvested and lovely bales of all sizes can be seen in the fields – round bales, small rectangular bales, oversized bales and I’ve even seen straw bales stacked up as high as a house! The sunshine over fields of hay is lovely and signifies the end of summer for me. And for the first time this year, I’ve seen hay stooks – traditional hay cutting and stacking by hand, ready for roof thatching, and a tradition that I’ve never seen before due to the rarity of the craft. Enjoy this lovely harvest field that I snapped a photo of recently:

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